• Rudolph Ian Alama | Philippine Information Agency

    January 14, 2019

    The Aboitiz Group which owns and operates the Cleanergy Park  in Punta Dumalag in Davao City is set to establish a pawikan rescue center inside the park.

    This after a memorandum of agreement was signed on Thursday, Jan. 10, between Aboitiz, the city government of Davao and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

    Jaime Jose Aboitiz, chief operating officer of Aboitiz Power cited the Cleanergy Park’s role in maintaining biodiversity in the area, educating the public about the value of protecting and preserving the critically endangered hawksbill turtles or pawikan and taking care of wounded and rescued pawikans before they are released to the wild.

    “The agreement we signed today is our way of formalizing this very important service Aboitiz is committed in building additional facilities for this purpose,” Aboitiz said during the MoA signing where he was joined by Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte and DENR-XI Regional Director Ruth Tawantawan.

    Once known as the pawikan sanctuary as it is the nesting site of hawksbill turtles, the park  is surrounded by a 37 hectare marine protected area. It was transformed into an eco-park and opened in 2015 where 13,000 mangrove seedlings were planted.

    To date, 3,482 turtle hatchlings have been discovered inside the park and released into the wild.

    Meanwhile Mayor Sara Duterte reiterated the commitment of the city government in the protection of the various species of sea turtles found in Davao City.

    “We look forward to the eventual creation of the Pawikan Rescue Center in Punta Dumalag not only to save our sea turtles but also other species of plant and animal life thriving within the marine protected area,” Duterte said during her speech at the MoA signing.

  • Hernel Tocmo | ABS-CBN News

    Mar 18 2019 04:04 PM

    Over 40 kilos of plastic trash were recovered from the stomach of a dead whale in the town of Mabini at the Compostela Valley.

    The Cuvier's beaked whale found last Friday was subjected by Darrel Blatchley, founder of the D'Bone Collector Museum, to a necropsy which revealed that its belly was filled with over 16 pieces of sacks, grocery bags, and other garbage.

    Blatchley said the whale died because of dehydration and starvation due to plastic ingestion.

    Blatchley appealed to the public to refrain from throwing plastic trash in waterways since these could be eaten by animals.

    "Every single river, every single canal goes directly to the ocean. So everything from small whales and dolphins, even the sea turtles are affected by this, as well as humans. We are eating the food that comes out of that ocean. So we're basically throwing our own garbage into our food source," he said.

    Just this year, 3 whales and dolphins were found dead along the Davao gulf after ingesting plastic garbage.

  • Marchel P. Espina | Rappler

    March 07, 2019 8:57 AM

    The Negros Occidental provincial government says it now prohibits the entry of coal-fired power plants in the province.

    Negros Occidental Governor Alfredo Marañon Jr made this declaration during the "Youth Strike for Negros," a silent protest participated by hundreds of youth leaders calling for urgent action from the provincial government, Wednesday, March 6, at the Capitol grounds.

    He also signed an Executive Order (EO) declaring the province as a source of clean and renewable energy and coal-free. The announcement pumped up the young crowd.

    The EO said the Renewable Energy (RE) Act of 2008 provides it is the state’s policy to encourage the development and utilization of RE sources as tools to effectively prevent or reduce harmful emissions and thereby balance the goals of economic growth and development with the protection of health and environment.

    “More and more countries have been decommissioning its coal-fired power plants due to the damage it causes to the environment and in fact have been shifting to RE projects,” it said, adding that with proper technology transfer, the province has the landscape, capacity, and resources for further development and investment in RE projects.

    These projects will not only address the energy supply but will also maintain the agricultural economic and social landscape of the province, the EO added.

  • Jun Ramirez | Manila Bulletin

    April 21, 2019, 11:29 AM

    The Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) is granting a 50 percent income tax discount to businesses that develop, use and distribute technologies that do not harm the environment.

    The tax incentive is provided under Revenue Regulations No. 5-2019 signed by Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez and BIR Commissioner Caesar Dulay.

    The guideline was reissued last week implementing the Philippine Green Jobs Law (RA 10771), stressing the role of the business community in reducing pollution and other environmental menace.

    Qualified to join the program are businesses engaged in production, manufacturing, processing, repacking and assembly as well as the sale of goods and services.

    Specifically, participants are required to come out with the so-called green technologies.

    The eco-friendly technologies refer to the development and application of products, equipment and systems used to conserve the environment and natural resources.

    To avail of the tax incentives, participants must register with the revenue district office where the business is registered.

    The regulations stated the entity “shall be entitled to a special deduction from the taxable income equivalent to 50 percent of the total expense for skills, training and research development expenses.”

  • Louise Bevan | The Epoch Times

    April 3, 2019

    It may not sound like a meal plan to aspire towards, but Yale University students made a fascinating discovery in 2012: a rare species of mushroom that can survive purely by feeding on plastic. The extraordinary mushroom that grows in the Amazon rainforest, “Pestalotiopsis microspora,” can feed on polyurethane (the main ingredient in plastic production), transforming the man-made ingredient into organic matter. The university’s research quickly gained traction, and some hugely impactful findings have been shared.

    Pestalotiopsis microspora can live without oxygen, which brought scientists to a very interesting conclusion: these mushrooms have the potential to be propagated at the bottom of landfill sites.

    The detritus that has amassed from decades upon decades of wasteful plastic usage presents a phenomenal undertaking, but scientists maintain that Pestalotiopsis microspora may, at the very least, change public perception of plastics in a helpful and progressive way, perhaps starting at the level of local community.

    If plastic-eating mushroom species were propagated at community composting centers, residents would have the opportunity to come face to face with nature’s very own plastic assailant. But beyond small-scale composting, we know that there’s a literal trash heap twice the size of Texas currently floating in the Pacific Ocean. Laurent Lebreton of the Ocean Cleanup Foundation emphasized a sense of urgency to USA Today: “Unless we begin to remove it,” he said, “some would say it may remain there forever.”

    Mother Nature has the answer, and it’s a tasty one: some plastic-eating mushrooms can be eaten by humans.

    Katharina Unger of Utrecht University devised an amazing demonstrative model, or “Fungi Mutarium,” a climate-controlled, dome-shaped environment in which agar cups were filled with plastic waste and oyster mushroom spores. Over the course of a month, the mushrooms’ roots consumed and transformed the plastic waste into edible material, without accumulating toxins. The “final product” could even be eaten whole, Unger revealed, tasting “sweet with the smell of anise or licorice.”

  • By Eireene Jairee Gomez | The Manila Times
     

    THE Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has ordered the closure of an open dumpsite in Limay, Bataan found to be illegally operating since 2015.

    Environment Undersecretary for Solid Waste Management Benny Antiporda said they already issued a cease and desist order against the municipal government of Limay, and summoned Mayor
    Lilvir Roque, Vice Mayor Robert Arvin Roque and the town councilors to explain the persistent operations of the illegal dumpsite.

    “It is like a Smokey Mountain in the making. We already closed the area to stop the operations and I doubt that they will be permitted by the MGB ( Mines and Geosciences Bureau) to operate even after they rehabilitate the area. But definitely the rehabilitation must start now,” Antiporda told The Manila Times.

    He noted that establishment and maintenance of an open dumpsite was strictly prohibited under Republic Act 9003 or the “Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000.”

    The DENR feared that various types of wastes from the open dumpsite located in Barangay San Francisco de Asis in Limay would reach the nearby body of waters, noting several connecting creeks and rivers in the area.

    Antiporda said Limay entered into a memorandum of agreement with Metro Clark Waste Management Corp. based in Pampanga for the disposal of its wastes after the dumpsite was closed three years ago.

    “We learned they have coordinated with Metro Clark, but it was only for a year. What we expected was that they would transfer their wastes to Clark, but unfortunately they resumed operations in the supposed-to-be closed dumpsite in Limay as it is illegal,” Antiporda added.

  • ENVIRONMENT Secretary Roy A. Cimatu on Sunday led simultaneous river and estero cleanups in 42 barangays in Metro Manila as part of the effort to rehabilitate Manila Bay.

    Cimatu believes that to rehabilitate Manila Bay, it is imperative to stop pollution at source.

    Some of the most polluted rivers and esteros that drain out to Manila Bay have been identified and targeted for the simultaneous river cleanup by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), which is taking the lead in the “Battle for Manila Bay,” a P4.7-billion, seven-year program to save Manila Bay from environmental degradation.

    The chairmen of these 42 barangay in the cities of Quezon, Caloocan, Valenzuela, Malabon and Navotas are also set to sign an agreement with the DENR.

    (Read More)

  • Rhodina Villanueva || The Philippine Star

    February 21, 2019 - 12:00am

    MANILA, Philippines — Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Roy Cimatu has urged governors from vulnerable provinces to fully implement a government program that would help protect communities from climate-induced disasters and spare future generations from the worst impacts of climate change.

    “Climate change is already here, and it will be here for the next generations. It is now, therefore, our obligation to take this program for implementation, so that the next generations will have a guide,” Cimatu said last Thursday, warning of a great fallout from climate change.

    (Read More)

  • By Ellalyn De Vera-Ruiz | Manila Bulletin

    Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Roy Cimatu urged governors from climate vulnerable provinces to fully implement a program that would help protect communities from climate-induced disasters in the future.

    “Climate change is already here, and it will be here for the next generations. It is now, therefore, our obligation to take this program for implementation, so that the next generations will have a guide,” Cimatu said. 

    (Read More)

  • Pilipino Mirror

    February 4th, 2019, 10:33 pm

    PAGTUTUUNAN  ng Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) ang 8 probinsiya bunsod ng panganib na nakaamba sa kanilang lugar na madalas daanan ng kalamidad.

    Tinukoy ni DENR Secretary Roy Cimatu ang walong prayoridad na probinsiya gaya ng Masbate, Sorsogon, Negros Oriental, Samar, Saranggani, Surigao del Sur, Surigao del Norte at Dinagat Islands bunsod ng panganib dulot ng pabago-bago ng panahon.

    (Read More)

  • By  Kuhlin Ceslie Gacula | Daily Tribune

    February 8, 2019 03:19 AM

    Environment Secretary Roy A. Cimatu expressed belief yesterday that a change in mindset is needed if the pollution-bedeviled Manila Bay is to be restored and preserved.

    “If they ask me what’s the most difficult part in rehabilitating Manila Bay, I would say it is changing our people’s behavior and attitude,” Cimatu said.

    He, however, said the seeming enthusiasm and willingness shown by 5,000 people at the start of the clean-up last 27 January showed there’s hope that change will come.

    (Read More)

  • By Ellalyn De Vera-Ruiz | Manila Bulletin

    February 5, 2019, 5:17 PM

    Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) Secretary Roy Cimatu will lead the resiliency planning and convergence budgeting for the eight priority climate vulnerable provinces in a high-level meeting at the DENR Central Office in Quezon City on Thursday.

    Cimatu, who is the chair of the Cabinet cluster on Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction will lead the meeting, which is expected to be attended by governors of the eight climate vulnerable provinces and key officials of the national government agencies, namely Department of Public Works and Highways, Department of Agriculture, and Department of Interior and Local Government.

    (Read More)

  • By BusinessMirror  |  Business Mirror

    SWELTERING hot days. Increased number of typhoons. Unprecedented instances of storm surges. These have become the norm nowadays, and people are quick to blame these on one thing: climate change.

    The global public’s awareness on the urgency of addressing climate change has increased over the years.

    In the Southeast Asian region alone, overall temperature has been increasing at a rate of 0.14 degrees Celsius to 0.20°C per decade since the 1960s, as reported in the Second Edition of the Asean Biodiversity Outlook (ABO 2) of the Asean Centre for Biodiversity (ACB).

    (Read More)

  • By Jonathan L. Mayuga  | Business Mirror

    ‘With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, compared to 2ºC, could go hand in hand with ensuring a more sustainable and equitable society,” the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said last week when it released the summary of its Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5ºC in Incheon, Korea.

    The scientific report, alarming as it is, drew various reactions with some environmental groups demanding for, bold climate action, a step backward from coal addiction and a step toward clean, renewable energy solutions.

    (Read More)

  • By New York Times News Service  |  Business Mirror

    December 9, 2018

    A flame emits from a chimney at the BASF chemical company in Ludwigshafen, Germany.

    Greenhouse-gas emissions worldwide are growing at an accelerating pace this year, researchers said a few days ago, putting the world on track to face some of the most severe consequences of global warming sooner than expected.

    Scientists described the quickening rate of carbon-dioxide emissions in stark terms, comparing it to a “speeding freight train” and laying part of the blame on an unexpected surge in the appetite for oil as people around the world not only buy more cars but also drive them farther than in the past—more than offsetting any gains from the spread of electric vehicles.

    (Read More)

  • By Jonathan L. Mayuga  |  Business Mirror

    December 11, 2018

    The Philippines continues to lead climate-vulnerable nations in seeking climate justice as it urged countries to push harder in the global fight against climate change.

    Climate Change Commission Secretary Emmanuel de Guzman, in a news statement, said the gathering of the world leaders at the 24th session of the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), commonly known as COP24, is an opportunity for countries to demonstrate their commitment and to set stronger climate action in Poland.

    (Read More)

  • By Catherine Teves  |  Philippine News Agency

    December 14, 2018, 8:15 pm

    MANILA -- The Philippines sees the need for more international climate action that will better protect the 6 million-square kilometer Coral Triangle, the marine area experts cited as center of marine biodiversity on Earth.

    Philippine Environment chief Roy Cimatu raised the urgency for elevating such need before the international community, noting climate change is already adversely affecting the Coral Triangle.

    (Read More)